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20130129
20130206
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
everyone. i'm susie gharib. the economy is barely growing, so the federal reserve says it will keep buying bonds to stimulate growth, and create more jobs. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. facebook's latest earnings beat the street, but while the company saw big gains in mobile ad sales, it's costs also shot up. >> susie: and rim, rolls out the new blackberry 10, a new name, and a new ticker symbol, we look at what's riding on all those bold moves. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the federal reserve said the economy "paused" in recent months, so it's keeping its key interest rate near zero. the decision from policymakers today came on a day of mixed reports about the u.s. economy. on the jobs front, a strong payrolls report showed private employers added 192,000 jobs in january, much more than economists expected. but the commerce department said economic growth, contracted in the last three months of 2012. the g.d.p. shrank by 0.1% the first time that's happened since the financial crisis began. the fed said in its policy statement today that it continues to see "downside risk
continues to see "downside risks" to the economy. unemployment is still "elevated". but household and business spending advanced. >> susie: darren gersh begins our coverage with that weak reading on the economy. >> reporter: last quarter, defense spending fell off the fiscal cliff. as lawmakers bickered, manufacturers who make things for the pentagon cut back production sharply-- defense spending fell 22% in the latest g.d.p. report, tipping the economy into the red. >> certainly manufacturers are pulling back and i think this is a bit of a wake up call that these cuts are real and that they have real effects on the economy. >> reporter: economists and markets did not panic over the drop into the red, because the economy is still showing signs of solid growth. businesses are still buying equipment and software. housing continues to bounce back. and consumer spending held up well, expanding at an annual rate of 2.2%. >> so if you look through some of the volatile components, demand underneath was solid and it doesn't suggest the economy is losing momentum. so a scary headline numb
, it was still a healthy number that should continue to help the economy. >> reporter: the main reason for optimism: those positive revisions to november and december jobs data. it turns out, the government underestimated how many positions were added by 127,000. it was that miscounthat helped push the dow over 14,000 for the first time in more than five years. and, at 14,000 the blue-chip index is about 150 to 200 points away from its all-time high. market pros like wayne kaufman predict new highs for stocks in coming weeks. >> many investors, retail investors, individual investors are reaching the point of recognition where they no longer believe the economy is going to collapse again, or that the stock market is going to collapse again. >> reporter: surely, an improving job market will keep investors jazzed about stocks. to that end, economists expect employers to continue adding about 150,000 jobs a month this year and the unemployment rate to inch lower. >> i think by the end of the year we're probably going to be looking at unemployment rate of 7.5% to 7.4%. certainly not low eno
and fives, i think it's going to cause... have many negative effects on the economy. >> reporter: however, if mortgage rates only move up slightly, that's likely to bring more buyers into the market. that's because many people have been waiting on the sidelines for a signal the housing market has bottomed. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: as home prices have risen, so have the stock prices of many home builders, with the stock prices more vulnerable than the housing market. the yellow line, the year-over-year changes in home prices. the blue line, the home builders' stomach exchange traded fund. they move higher before home prices do, and move lower before the prices crack. megan mcgrath is with us tonight. you've looked at this relationship between the actual price of homes and the home building stocks. what does the rally in home building stocks tell you today about home prices in the month ahead. >> it is certainly telling us investors are expecting prices to continue to go up, and to go up quite a bit. prices as well as volume. there is a relationship there, too. we heard so
want the sequester actually to go forward which would put the breaks on the economy at least to an extent and drive more people back into bonds. >> reporter: others say any return to bonds may be short- lived, as the u.s. economy is showing new signs of strength. >> i think we expect more improvements, moderate improvements. but, you know overall that's usually a cause or thought that rates could go higher. and, in that regard it's probably not a market that will have the same sort of returns that we've seen over the past two years. >> reporter: so, it seems most agreehe bond market i unlikely to be a cash cow for investors going forward. at the same time, however, worries about a bond market bubble seem unfounded. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report." >> susie: immigration reform takes center stage this week. a group of senate democrats and republicans agreed today on what they called a framework for comprehensive immigration reform. tomorrow, president obama heads to las vegas to give a policy speech on immigration. with washington focused on immigration, citizenship fo
the economy, and worries about tomorrow's important jobs report. jobless claims rose by 38,000, more than expected. consumer spending rose slightly in december, as personal income climbed 2.6%, the highest increase in eight years, on this last trading day of january, the dow lost almost 50 points, the nasd was unchanged, and the s&p fell about four points. despite the sell off today, january was a strong month for stocks. the dow surged 6%, its best january since 1994. a 4% gain on the nasdaq, and the s&p jumped 5%. on wall street, they say a big january for stocks usually means a big year as well, it's called the "january barometer." if stocks follow history, they could be up by 20% or more. will that hold true in 2013? joining us with his thoughts on that, scott wren, senior equity strategist, wells fargo advisors. so scott, are you changing any of your forecasts for this year based on this strong january? >> well, susie, really january has been stronger than what we thought. we've had a 15, 25, year entarget out there for the s&p 500. and we're certainly reassessing that. we want to lo
of fear about inflation. specifically, they worry the federal reserve's efforts to boost the economy will devalue the dollar, so they want to own alternative currencies. but silver doesn't just benefit from safe-haven buying, it's also an industrial commodity. it's used in automobile manufacturing. and many automakers are forecasting increased global demand for new cars and trucks. the big question, of course, is where silver heads from here. from 2001 to 2010, silver moved frombout $4 an oun to $2 but in 2011, prices peaked at nearly $50, but then pulled back. according to a recent survey, precious metals experts think silver will average around 40 dollars an ounce this year, a gain of over 30% from 2012. so what could derail the silver rally? >> silver has been kind of trading between this 28 and 32 level for some time now. and, i think if you find that there is a raise in interest rates to curb inflation, i think you are going to find that's very bearish for silver. >> reporter: another risk is a big rally in the stock market. if investors get more comfortable with risk, they may
. those cuts are called the sequester, and the worry is they could hit the u.s. economy hard. as darren gersh reports, president obama today asked congress to delay the cuts before the march 1 deadline. >> reporter: with $44 billion in spending cuts in defense and most other federal programs just weeks away, the president urged congress to pass a mix of spending cuts and tax increases to ease the immediate hit. >> there is no reason that the jobs of thousands of americans who work in national security or education or clean energy, not to mention the growth of the entire economy, should be put in jeopardy just because folks in washington couldn't come together to eliminate a few special interest tax loopholes. >> reporter: republicans dismissed the calls for more tax increases, and many argue the threat of the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester are the only way to force democrats to accept more spending cuts. but their leverage may be limited. >> i think we will have the sequester for a short period of time, probably until the first civilian employee of the government is furl
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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